All in a day…dress

January 10, 2017

 

 The V&A seminar,  an invitation to speak on the BBC’s iconic radio programme Woman’s Hour, and a new commision from the King’s Singers have all given life an added spice just in time for Christmas.  That is excluding the daywear pieces I have had to see through for my regular clients.

I don’t know why, but there appears to be a resurgence in the orders for daydresses amongst my clients.  This one will be sent off to Amsterdam in the next couple of days.

 

 

It makes a change from the 2-pc jacket with trousers or skirt, maybe due to the use of the dress as an alternative to stretch the wardrobe.

 

The lure of the daydress is its practicality.  It can be as versatile as a suit, and its sense of tailored femininity gives a figure enhancing simplicity.

I see the advantage in its flexibility;

  • can be worn from day to evening

  • is easily accommodated and accessorised with staple garments

  • comfortable, with less fit and constriction at the waist

  • with colour and detail it can enhance proportions

It has an inbuilt convenience too when it comes to travelling; much easier to pack than a suit.

 

And there are many variations;

  • Shirtwaist, a dress with a bodice (waist) like a tailored shirt and an attached straight or full skirt

  • Sheath, a fitted, often sleeveless dress, often without a waistseam(1960s)

  • Shift, a straight dress with no waist shaping or seam (1960s)

  • Jumper dress (American English) or Pinafore dress (British English) is a sleeveless dress intended to be worn over a layering top or blouse. Jumper dresses exist for both summer and winter wear.

  • Sundress is an informal sleeveless dress of any shape in a lightweight fabric, for summer wear.

  • Tent, a dress flared from above the bust, sometimes with a yoke (1960s, renewed popularity after 2005)

  • Maxi dress, a long, formfitting, floor or ankle length dress.

  • Wrap dress, a dress with a front closure formed by wrapping one side across the other and knotting the attached ties on the side, or fastening buttons. This forms a V-shaped neckline and hugs a woman’s curves. A faux wrap dress resembles this design, except that it comes already fastened together with no opening in front, but instead is slipped on over the head. (1970s; renewed popularity from late 1990s)

 

 

Here is something with a wholly different sense of ‘attitude’ which was commissioned from me during my time at Hardy Amies.

 

I feel that a tailored daydress is a very good start when planning a wardrobe, and also a welcome addition to a set of staple garments already in place.

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